Author: Sally :)

Comics-Based Research Comes to Ottawa

Comics-Based Research Comes to Ottawa

That’s right! When I am not skating the Rideau Canal I will be a lucky guest at Carleton Uni/ University of Ottawa giving a lecture and a workshop on comics based research, and promoting the work of CBR Lab. I look forward to seeing everyone 

The Traveling Carers in Higher Ed Exhibit Pops Up At Middlesex Uni

The Traveling Carers in Higher Ed Exhibit Pops Up At Middlesex Uni

The arts-based Carers in Higher Education project from Professor Marie-Pierre Moreau and myself has been to lots of exciting places, but this past week saw it installed at Middlesex University London. I am so pleased that it is up and generating some productive conversation amongst 

Kapow!

Kapow!

My new chapter on arts-based research has come out– and the fancy hard copy text arrived at my door this morning. I’m delighted that my chapter, which is a comics-based how-to and discussion of CBR methods in educational research in particular, is included in Jason DeHart and Peaches Hash’s edited volume, Arts-Based Research Across Visual Media in Education: Expanding Visual Epistemology- Volume 2. I’m right there in the beginning so you can’t miss me.

Here’s the official text description:

“In company with its sister volume, this book explores arts-based approaches to research across media, including film and comics-related material, from a variety of geographic locations and across a range of subdisciplines within the field of education. This second volume has a focus exclusively on visual output and image-based research and methods.

The book aims to highlight some of the approaches that are not always centered in arts-based research. The visual takes center stage as authors lead with comics-based representations, among other forms of arts-based inquiry. These chapters follow on from the first collection and serve to expand thinking about merging creative methods with analysis and exploration in the world of education. From mixtapes to the curatorial, these chapters showcase the ways in which scholars explore the multitude of human experiences. This second volume covers, among other topics: comics in qualitative research, visual journaling, multimodal fieldnotes and discourse, and creative visual outputs.

It is suitable reading for graduate students and scholars interested in qualitative inquiry and arts-based methods, in education and the social sciences.”

I had a great time writing and illustrating this and I hope you enjoy it.


Join me (virtually) in New Zealand to learn how to use comics to analyze qualitative data.

Join me (virtually) in New Zealand to learn how to use comics to analyze qualitative data.

You don’t have to actually be in New Zealand for this one! Should be a hoot. Join us for qual love, Kiwi style. Via zoom. All the details are below. https://www.researchaccelerator.nz/bundles/ra2023 I will be talking about how to draw your qualitative dissertation/book/thesis/next paper. (Also points 

Comics Fest and Related Comics and Fests

Comics Fest and Related Comics and Fests

It has been a very big month or two for comics and comics-based research. I mean, to be honest, when isn’t it big month? A few things past and future going on:

EXEUNT OMNES

EXEUNT OMNES

Look look! It’s a new publication! This is my comics-based piece appearing in Leaving the Field, edited by Robin James Smith and Sara Delamont. This was one of those projects that was a pleasure to write because the editors were so very lovely from start to finish. They worked with the fact that all the contributors were writing during the worst paroxysms of covid, amid the disruptions of our lives and work. It is also the very last thing I wrote that appears under the old surname.

This book is all about leaving the field in countless ways –from flourish to sneak to quiet goodbyes to tears to joy–and my chapter is a comics-based meditation on it all. In it, I draw upon the work of two of my heroes: First, a piece by my former colleague at Anthropology and Education Quarterly, the brilliant Dr. Ariana Mangual Figueroa. Her chapter in Paris & Winn’s Humanizing Research is titled, “La Carta de Responsibilidad: The Problem of Departure” , and it was my introduction to responsibility and risk and kindness and complexity as tied up in the researcher role.

Second, I was so inspired here by the work of Lochlann Jain, fellow artist and expansive, creative thinker. His Things That Art was what made my comic work in research and representation possible, full stop. There’s never been a more elegant take on the potential beauty of visual thinking in anthropology than this. I want to be him when I grow up. Seriously, Lochlann. Text me. Anytime.

If you are interested in reading this book, and my chapter in it, you can find it here (and certainly at your university library) https://manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/9781526157652/

Pirie [as Galman], S. C. (2023). Exeunt omnes: The case for bad exits in childhood ethnography. In Smith R. J. & Delamont, S. (Eds.). Leaving the field. pp 45-61. Manchester University Press.

Have you always dreamed of guest editing a special issue of Pedagogy, Culture & Society?

Have you always dreamed of guest editing a special issue of Pedagogy, Culture & Society?

Well, now is your chance! Call for Proposals The editors of Pedagogy, Culture & Society invite colleagues in the field to submit proposals for Special Issues on themes of interest to scholars and researchers within the areas of the journal’s aims and scope. Typically, Special 

Webinar on child-created media from the ALA Film and Media Round Table

Webinar on child-created media from the ALA Film and Media Round Table

Update: We had a fantastic time. Look for the link to the recorded webinar here soon! On August 7th at 12pm Pacific Time, the Film and Media Round Table (a unit of the American Library Association) is going to have a webinar focused on youth-created media. 

The Name Game

The Name Game

As some of you folks know, I recently changed my last name. For lots of academic people, and especially women, the name game is one you can’t actually win. There is so much to say about women, about names, about cis-heteronormativity, history, tradition and patriarchy, about children and bodies and personhood, lots more than I could squeeze into a little comic, but it’s a start. You can read the whole original, terribly honest, profanity-laced (and rightly so) work right here.

Arts-Based Project with Professor Marie-Pierre Moreau recognized as ARU research highlight for 2022

Arts-Based Project with Professor Marie-Pierre Moreau recognized as ARU research highlight for 2022

You can see the whole project and learn more about the project and shows near you here, and follow Professor Moreau’s work, on this project and so many more here. You can read about all of the Anglia Ruskin University highlights here.